Music

Made To Last
Known for the straightforwardness and simplicity of their no frills country, the... more
Known for the straightforwardness and simplicity of their no frills country, the husband-and-wife team sticks to what they know best with Made to Last: uncomplicated, heartfelt stories and fun-loving melodies, highlighting the duo’s down-home appeal that Country Weekly describes as an “effortless musical chemistry.”A departure from the majority of their past albums, which feature wife Joey taking hold of the vocal reigns, Made to Last sees both Feek and Martin taking their turn in the lead vocalist spotlight. Rory’s genuine, engaging voice and Joey’s warm, pure vocal stylings, heralded as “sparkling” by LA Times critic Randy Lewis, are highlighted throughout the album by a group of top-tier songwriters and musicians including master tunesmith Allen Shamblin (“I Can’t Make You Love Me”) and Neil Young/Mark Knopfler drum vet, Chad Cromwell.Because of the intimate nature of the album, each song on Made to Last holds an individual significance for the duo. In fact, every track seems to come complete with its own personal backstory about why it was included on the record, providing listeners with a glimpse into the heart and soul of the tender duo. From paying homage to inspirations with cover tracks like Townes Van Zandt’s “If I Needed You” and Jamie O’Hara’s “50,000 Names,” to brand new cuts like the songwriter's anthem "To Do What I Do" written by Joey+Rory's friend Tim Johnson who sadly lost his fight with cancer last October, the Rory co-penned Zac Brown smash “Good Truck” or the playful “I Love You Song” (Feek’s Valentine’s Day present to Martin), Made to Last is littered with personal touches and heart-felt sentiment that feels right at home, in any home.Before joining forces with his wife in 2008, Rory Feek was already one of the most sought after songwriters on Music Row, penning multiple number one hits including Blake Shelton’s “Some Beach” and Easton Corbin’s “A Little More Country Than That.” Together as Joey+Rory, Feek and Martin rose to fame as finalists on the CMT talent competition Can You Duet in 2008. They have since garnered multiple chart topping singles and both CMA and ACM nods, including the Academy of Country Music’s Top New Vocal Duo of the Year award in 2010.Currently, they can be seen every Friday night, all across the country, on The Joey+Rory Show, their critically acclaimed television series filmed live at the couple’s Pottsville, Tennessee farm and broadcast on rural America’s RFD-TV. They are also enjoying success with their weekly radio broadcast, The Joey+Rory Radio Show, played every Saturday night before the Grand Ole Opry on 650 AM WSM.“I think it took us a while to really understand the importance of the music we were making,” Feek admits. “I believe the key to our success has been to not measure it by normal standards. If we’re being ourselves and being authentic with our music and our approach to making it… then that’s success for us."Joey+Rory are co-headlining an album release show at Nashville’s historic Belcourt Theatre tonight, October 2nd, with their daughter, Heidi Feek, who is also releasing an album next week. Tickets may be purchased through the Belcourt Theatre's website or in person at the box office. The duo will also be performing at the Schermerhorn Symphony Center in support of Don Williams on October 6th and 7th, right before Made to Last hits stores. less
Inspired
Tried-and-true gospel favorites, combined with newer songs written fresh from their... more
Tried-and-true gospel favorites, combined with newer songs written fresh from their own experiences, comprise this musical treasure. Honest, beautiful and down-to-earth, this country-gospel collection truly lives up to its name. less
His and Hers
 His and Hers, more than any prior Joey+Rory release, gracefully and thoroughly... more
 His and Hers, more than any prior Joey+Rory release, gracefully and thoroughly underlines what Joey and Rory are together, as a singing team, as songwriters, as family, as country artists and fans.While its predecessors offered polished, powerful examples of Joey’s vocal prowess, Rory felt that listeners still hadn’t experienced the full spectrum of his wife’s voice. His and Hers producer/Grammy winner Gary Paczosa, Rory says, helped them bring listeners closer to the version of Joey’s voice that Rory knows best: the one that beams so distinctly and honestly in their home, in front of the kitchen hearth with their family.“As great as we thought and a lot of people thought our first two records were, I would not hesitate to say, ‘You still don't know how good she sings; you should really come set at our table and listen to her with just a guitar,’” Rory says. “But with this record, I really feel like he took that part of her voice that feels so special and intimate in simple settings, and somehow captured it perfectly and made it even better. And that's a big deal.” That sense of intimacy flows through many of the narratives captured on His and Hers, too. less
The Life of a Song
  1. Play The Song

     

    It’s too fast, it’s too slow

    It’s too country, too rock and roll

    It’s too happy, too sad, too short, or it’s way too long

    Yeah and it’s too bad they don’t just

     

    Chorus

                Play the song, play the song

                Turn it up loud enough we can all sing along

                And let the people decide if the music is right or it’s wrong

                Man it’s a shame, instead of playing the game

                Play the song, play the song

     

    It’s too Garth, too George Strait

    Too right down the center, too left of the plate

    The hook’s too weak or the subject matter’s way too strong

    Yeah and it’s too bad they don’t just

     

    (Repeat Chorus)

     

    And it’s too bad, if you ask me

    Our songs gotta be song darn P.C.

    So DAMN P.C.

     

    (Repeat Chorus)

               

    Play the song, play the song

The Only
Heidi Feek isn’t the only hip, twenty-something daughter of a country music hitmaker... more
Heidi Feek isn’t the only hip, twenty-something daughter of a country music hitmaker to burst onto the Nashville scene, but one listen to the seductive mezzo vocals and reverb-drenched musicality on her debut full-length album, The Only, and it’s easy to see how she sets herself apart.Feek’s music, self-described as “the swoon of Patsy Cline and the vibe of Chris Isaak.” isn’t necessarily what you would expect from the daughter of country music visioneers Joey+Rory, but then again it is. Staying true to her roots, the melodies of The Only are anchored in a timeless songwriting style evocative of the days when Roy Orbison ruled the Nashville sound, yet Feek’s raw and unbridled vocal stylings coupled with the edgy, youthful execution of the album’s instrumentation, effortlessly bring this record to the forefront of contemporary nostalgia artistry.Brought to life in Nashville’s Welcome to 1979 studio (Keane, JEFF The Brotherhood), the warmth of the analog methods used to record the album provide the perfect setting for showcasing Feek’s innate storytelling sensibilities through her songwriting. “I always love a good story,” she admits. “Whether it's in a song, book, movie, or poem... I soak it all up.” And it’s her love for narrative that shines throughout the entirety of The Only. Each track on the 11- song album offers up it’s own compelling storyline, creating multiple individual moments frozen in time. Tracks like the Sun-Studio-reminiscent “57 Bel Air” have you flying down the highway with all the windows rolled down, while the Tarantino-esque “One Night With You” puts you straight in the middle of a racy love triangle in Spanish Harlem.For The Only, Feek’s penchant for spinning stories is highlighted by a band of some of Nashville’s strongest music industry vets and up-and-coming musicians. Grammy-nominated songwriter James Slater (Kenny Chesney, Jamey Johnson) along with strat-man Jeremy Fetzer (Caitlin Rose) and rhythm kings Michael Rinne (Jack White) and Evan Hutchings (Escondido) make the tracks jump straight off of the 2” tape they were recorded on.“I’m passionate about good music,” Feek explains. “By ‘good,’ I mean lyrically, musically, and artistically. The whole package.” And it’s clear from her seemingly effortless personal sensibilities and artistry that she holds her own work to that measure of quality. Her musical dexterity and seasoned on-stage presence give her the aura of an experienced musical veteran wise beyond her years, a direct reflection of her upbringing in the music business.Growing up around Nashville’s top tunesmiths (the likes of Waylon Jennings and Harlan Howard), a young Heidi used to tag along Music Row with her father, falling asleep in his guitar case as he made the rounds as a songwriter in the 90’s. “Dad used to play the bars trying to make it in town,” she recalls. “I have many, many memories of sitting at honkytonks until very late at night, eating cherries with my sister, and singing along to Dwight Yoakam songs he would play. I actually got my start as a performer getting up during those gigs and singing an old Bobby Bare song called 'Daddy What If.’”Inspired by her environment, she soon began teaching herself how to play guitar and writing her own music. “My dad was always one of my biggest musical inspirations in that regard,” she admits. “He instilled an attention to detail in me, lyrically, that I’m very thankful for. He would always play me his new songs and ask for my opinions on them. Then he would smile at me like I wasn’t 9 years old and knew what I was talking about. He always indulged my thought process, even as a child. It taught me a lot.”Along side her parents, Feek garnered musical credits on multiple top selling albums, toured overseas, and even performed on the Opry stage on more than one occasion, but it didn’t take long before she felt the need to break out and forge her own musical path. less